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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
to shape where the taliban goes because, of course, its internal issue is that the afghan taliban began to actually seed and grow in insurgency inside pakistan that they had to deal with, and i think that's fundamental. the troops on the ground don't necessarily help us solve that problem. other issues, money and other elements of state, will help us influence pakistan. >> what do we know about conversations between the karzai regime and the taliban, the negotiations in france? >> well, president karzai during our interview said that they are currently still in negotiations and talking to the taliban, but there hasn't been any proof that they actually have been because the taliban themselves they send emails and talk to us on the phone as journalists and they tell us that in no way will they talk to what they call the puppet regime of america, referring to president karzai in his government, but the afghan officials that we speak to, they say that they are currently talking to the taliban, but they may be. we just don't know what level of the taliban that they're talking to. >> i know t
and taliban takeover. as for president karzai, he said he would like to see levels around 15,000 but today suggested numbers are less important than u.s. cooperation and supplying the them with tanks and drones. how much will it all cost? already the u.s. and allies pledged $16 billion in civilian aid and military ops on top of $642 billion the u.s. spent since 9/11 and 2,100 u.s. lives lost. let's start with kristen welker. what are you hearing came out of the meeting? >> reporter: a couple of headlines out of today's meeting. the withdrawal plans have been accelerated a bit. both announcing that u.s. troops handing over control to afghan forces this spring. that is a few months earlier than expected so that means that u.s. troops will shift their role in afghanistan. they will be taking on a role of advising, assisting and training afghan forces. president obama making it very clear, though, u.s. troops will still be in harm's way if they continue to be in the country. the big question mark remanes, how many troops are in afghanistan after 2014? today, president obama not answering that
is still around. >> indeed, he is. at least nine people suspected to be taliban fighters are dead after a suspectedu drone strike in pakistan's tribal areas. the target, three taliban compounds. it is believed two major commanders are among the dead, in the unsupervised bomb squads. that's the third u.s. drone strike in five days itch there was a sharp divide in congress between those who voted for the fiscal cliff bill and those who did not -- taxes versus spending. but will those differences come up again in the debt ceiling debate? we have jeff duncan, a republican from south carolina, and representative elliot engle, a democrat from new york. gentlemen, thank you for joining us. representative duncan, you voted against the fiscal cliff deal. tell us why? >> absolutely. we are not in this situation in america with our economy and our government because we have under-taxed americans. we are here because we spend too much money. this plan had over $40 of tax revenue increases for every dollar that was cult. it should be $44 for cuts fur every dollar increased. >> you voted for the deal
priorities backwards. if taliban takes control again in afghanistan, we won't have to worry about protecting drone bases or diplomats because we won't be there at all. and i think this is part of the unreality of the obama administration's approach there. the low troop numbers that they're contemplating, that they will be discussing with president karzai will not be any where near sufficient to accomplish our strategic objective, america's strategic objective which is defeating the taliban. and i think we're --. bill: it is fascinating. i apologize for the interruption how the events in benghazi are now shaping our foreign policy whether this administration wants to admit it or not. >> well that perhaps is the small glimmer of good news that they recognize that benghazi was a real debacle for our security policies for embassies overseas but the larger question here in afghanistan is the administration's unwillingness to do what we need to do to prevent 10 years of sacrifice and loss of life by our forces from simply being wasted if the taliban come back into power. bill: well this administra
? >>> worldwide for the amazing triumph over the taliban. after they, of course, shot malala in the head. she has been discharged from the hospital. cnn national correspond respondent matthew chance is following developments from london. what is the hospital saying this morning? >> pretty good news malala yousefzai laying in the hospital since shot by the taliban, making a pretty good recovery. this is a picture of her walking out of her hotel room. speaking with nurses who have been giving medical care over the past several months. a statement saying malala is a strong young woman and worked hard with people caring for her to make excellent progress in her recovery. she will be staying at her parents' temporary home in birmingham in england, where the hospital is located. they have been flown out from pakistan. the father has been given a job in birmingham for the next three years as the consulate. they expect to stay there for the foreseeable future. she will be going back into the ward wards at the end of this month, beginning of next month to have reconstruction on her skull. a recovery, but
negotiating power with the taliban. >> the position we take in showing that we are going to continue to complete this mission, the better the chances we have to ultimately achieve political reconciliation. >> the pentagon was only the beginning of the afghan president's visit to washington. >> our meeting, i believe, helped -- will help lay the ground work for president karzai's discussions tomorrow with president obama. >> sources say president karzai and his defense minister brought a wish list to the pentagon, drones, helicopters, and hardware to support their security forces. >> what we talked about yesterday was, you know, let's move beyond a wish list of equipment. >> the u.s. want assurances the terrorists won't set up troops in afghanistan after the troops leave. karzai agreed. >> be able to provide security to these people. >> but a recent pentagon reports that the afghan border patrol relies on the u.s. for even its most basic needs, food and water. it's rife with illiteracy, lack of accountability, and corruption. and these conditions are expected to endure beyond 2014. bu
of the taliban until the u.s. -led invasion of 2001. >> we are committed to doing everything we can to assist you in this time of transition to new afghanistan and afghanistan where people will be able to live in peace. >> it's now a democratic country with an elected government, with human rights for all. >> hamid karzai made his first visit to washington 11 years ago this month. >> how do you expect american forces to stay in afghanistan? >> as long as we are still have terrorist items. and as long as the bad guys are there. americans go out, unless we finish the job. >> how many american troops will remain after the u.s. combat mission ends next year is now being decided. karzai may not like the answer. >> president karzai relationship with president bush was very congenial. but it all changed when president obama came to office. president karzai got increasingly distant largely by the assessment by some there, the insiders in washington that president karzai was part of the problem. >> two nationwide elections have been held in afghanistan since 2001, but corruption persists and despite pledg
, continuing to provide advisorses. in other words, give them the tools to fight the taliban. i think that in fact they're going to be motivated, partly because the taliban are going to behave so badly like they did before that we will find afghans win to fight them. it might not necessarily be president karzai, but there will be afghan actors who will fight the taliban. >>brian: you say one of the things the soviets did wrong, the soviet union collapsed, gorbachev takes over, and the reason why what the afghans left collapsed is because the soviets cut them off. >> gorbachev continued to arm them. it was yeltsin. as soon as yeltsin took over at our behest, he took overt marxist regime and within months it fell. >>brian: you look at egypt and iraq, you've been to iraq when saddam was in power in afghanistan, and you say wait, when we pull out, they'll realize we are best friend they could possibly have. >> i think what they're going to find is their problems aren't over. in other words, they've got an awful lot of enemies in that part of the world. everyone hates each other more than
of the other big things the pentagon wants to know if afghan leaders will keep the taliban out of their country after u.s. troops lead. what karzai had to say about that when i see you next. live in washington kyla campbell. >>> time 5:15. weeks after metal thieves stole a war memorial from a park in petaluma donations are pouring in to -- stolen from walmart park sometime around september 21st. authorities think thieves used an electric saw to remove a plaque from its base. they have raised more than $9,000 to replace that plaque. >>> north bay an overflow crowd at the third and final community forum on gun violence. bay area congressman mike thompson hosted the meeting. thompson is chairman of the gun violence prevention task force. last night people packed the hallway just waiting to speak. >> gun owners have responsibilities to keep those guns out of the hands of mentally ill, drug years,. >> i see no purpose whatsoever to own an assault weapon. at the same time i am not in favor of gun control. >> congressman thompson has held meetings in vallejo and napa. he'll take back what he has heard
for afghan women as the taliban returns. i find that a very scary report. >> the other people scared are the pakistanis. >> right. >> looking at what's happening says kroog the border, if we are completely pulling out. what does it say about the surge and the american lives that were lost with that escalation? >> if you look at the pentagon's own most recent report on what's been the last six months in afghanistan, you will -- of the most recent -- the most repeat report from the pentagon on previous six months in afghanist afghanistan, you will see that the levels of violence that have returned to -- are now greater than presurge levels. this obviously brings us to the conclusion that the surge has made no difference. now, the military will disagree with that, and i would say the surge has made a difference in parts of afghanistan, in southern afghanistan, and helmand province especially where 20,000 marines were there. they're leaving soon. it did make a difference to some degree in kandahar, so i think the zero option is partly strategic. it was partly to negotiate with karzai to
there can the afghan forces deal with call died? will taliban take over the country? will al qaeda come back in as a welcome guest? will they move over from pakistan? will they use afghanistan to destablize pakistan which has nuclear arsenal of over 100 weapons? what price security? how much did 9/11 cost us? we have to remember that. we have to be careful we don't just think about dollars and we think about security. melissa: we still have to think about dollars. that is what we started the show talking about how we're spending so much more than we're taking in. everybody has to give something up. we have got to cut money somewhere. when you look at dollars, we have 10,000 troops in there after 2014 it could cost $15 billion a year. 20,000 troops, that is $25 billion a year. the numbers become significant. a lot of americans wonder what are we getting for that? is it worth it when we're really going broke here in this country? >> well the way i see it, i don't quibble with you about getting our economic house in order coming from a conservative think tank of. i think we're in agreement ther
they have a government that's not taliban and al-qaeda free? how much does it mean to you and those who lost their lives? >> it means a lot to me. the afghan people made a lot of progress. if go back from 1979, really until the present, they've been at war. the country has been torn apart. in the last few years, they have made progress, more rights for women, more kids in schools, economic progress and a lot of different things. they don't want to lose that. to me, it's very important for our moral responsibility to the afghan people, but also for our geostrategic interest in the region. i don't necessarily think that means thousands of american troops there. i do think that it means a strategic partnership to secure in the minds of afghan people that they've got a friend. >> steve: we want to talk to you on the other side of a quick timeout about saddam hussein because there is some stuff that you can clarify for us. so the general is sticking around. more on his great new book "my share of the task" coming up. >> brian: let's check in with bill hemmer to find out what's coming up at the to
around in afghanistan when they were hunting the taliban. >> right. >> will you just give us an insight on the problems that we face getting rid of, you know, these magazine clips where you can, you know, shoot off, you know, dozens of bullets in seconds? and some of these assault weapons that, again, are made for one reason and one reason only, to kill as many human beings as quickly as possible. talk about the challenges. because i know there are 40 democrats in the house that are going to fight getting rid of assault weapons. of course, most of the republicans are going to fight it. what's the great challenge there? >> i think that you're right, joe, and general mcchrystal was right, these are weapons of war. they are not weapons that you go hunting with or really that you can protect yourself with. you know, there is going to be a discussion. you know, starting today, we're going to hear it from governor cuomo. the vice president's having a series of meetings today. he's going to come out with a series of proposals very soon. assault weapons will most likely be part of that. we had
for stability if we're out entirely in two years and the taliban knows we're going to be out? and even with 70,000 troops on the ground right now, is that really possible? >> i think we've grown afghan capability a lot. but they've got to step up and actually use it. i think what president obama has offered is a strategic partnership. president karzai will be here this week in d.c. visiting president obama, and i suspect they'll be talking about something that is a durable, long-term, sustainable relationship which allows us to help without allowing us to do too much. >> have you seen the movie "zero dark thirty" yet? >> i have. i think the depiction of the raid really captures -- i went on about 150 similar raids. it's real in tenor and tone. the second is, they show a decade-long effort by hundreds of thousands of professionals day after day, year after year, despite sacrifices. i think it captures that well. >> you were part of that, and we certainly appreciate your service. >> david, thanks for having me. >> i read your book and very much enjoyed it, his new book called "my share of the ta
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)

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